General Registration is now Closed

We’re pleased to announce that thanks to overwhelming support, interest in Linux Plumbers Conference has exceeded expectations.  The downside is that the conference is now officially full. Originally we were going to post a warning today, but a sudden surge of corporate registrations caught us off guard, so we had to close immediately.

If you still haven’t registered but would like to participate, contact us. We are running a waiting list on a first come first serve basis but with priority given to people who have accepted microconference topics. You could also try to use one of the sponsors tickets if your employer can provide one to you.

We look forward to seeing you in Seattle for a memorable conference.

Graphics Microconference Accepted into 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference

Although the Year of the Linux Desktop has yet to arrive, a surprising number of Linux users nevertheless need graphics support. This is because there have been a number of years of the Linux smartphone, the Linux television, the Linux digital sign/display/billboard, the Linux automobile, and more. This microconference will cover a number of topics including atomic modesetting in KMS, buffer allocation, verified-secure graphics pipelines, fencing and synchronisation, Wayland, and more.

For more information on this important topic, see the wiki page.

Thermal Microconference Accepted into 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference

In stark contrast with decades past, thermal issues in computer systems now means much more than fans and heat sinks, and this microconference looks at some of the things that are now handled in software. The topics include the thermal framework, handling of temperature sensors, and different approaches to handling overtemperature conditions, ranging up to and including closed-loop control. Of course, software that is not tested can be assumed not to work, and the best way to ensure that testing happens when needed is to automate it, so automated testing of thermal subsystems is also on the agenda. Coordination with userspace is useful in order to determine how best to shed computational load, as is coordination among multiple cooling devices.

For more information on this important new-to-Plumbers topic, see the wiki page.

File and Storage Systems Microconference Accepted into 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference

Despite having been in production use for many decades, file and storage systems are very active areas, and have retained the ability to provide many new-technology surprises. This year’s edition of the File and Storage Systems Microconference will look at improved error reporting, filesystem-level encryption in traditional filesystems, SMR drives, online fsck, persistent memory, smart block-layer support in traditional filesystems, better interoperability of and support for NFS and Samba, userspace filesystem innovations, and much else besides.

For more information on this topic, see the wiki page.

Boot, Init, and Config Microconference Accepted into 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference

The combination of security issues, kernel tinification, and a renewed concern about fast boot has intensified focus on system boot, initialization, and configuration, so much so that there is now a Linux Plumbers Conference Microconference focused on these topics.

In addition to secure boot and minimizing size and bloat, this microconference will delve into a number of topics related to boot speed. These topics include tuning systemd for embedded systems, optimizing and/or delaying memory initialization, deferring initcall-based initialization, introducing parallelism and multicore earlier in boot, speeding up early-boot I/O, pre-loading known configurations, speeding up installation, and of course improved timing and tracing analysis earlier in system startup. In short, the fast-boot work has definitely moved into the sub-second realm. A final bonus topic is better configuring for cloud- and container-based workloads.

For more information on this topic, see the wiki page.

Persistent Memory Microconference Accepted into 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference

The topic of persistent memory is back to the future for those of us old enough to have used core memory, but today’s persistent memory boasts densities, speeds, latencies, and capacities that are well beyond the scope even of science fiction back in the core-memory era.

However, with extreme densities, speeds, latencies, and capacities come interesting technical challenges. This microconference will therefore cover the “struct page” problem, performance hotspots in both kernel and userspace I/O fastpaths, managing access mechanisms such as DAX, providing atomic sector updates, and more.

For more information on this topic, see the wiki page.

We hope to see you there!

Performance and Scalability Microconference Accepted into 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference

Core counts keep rising, and that means that the Linux kernel continues to encounter interesting performance and scalability issues. Which is not a bad thing, since it has been well over ten years since the “free lunch” of exponential CPU-clock frequency increases came to an abrupt end. This microconference will therefore look at futex scaling, address-space scaling, improvements to queued spinlocks, additional lockless algorithms, userspace per-CPU critical sections, and much else besides.

For more information on this topic, please see the wiki page.

Networking Microconference Accepted into 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference

In the past, this has been called the Network Virtualization Microconference, but this year’s instance is branching out to include IPv6 and Security.

Network-virtualization topics include networking for multi-tenant container clusters, reducing network-namespace load on the system, intelligent processing at the edge of the data center, programmable datapath (as in fun with eBPF, OVS, nft, and much else besides), hardware support, and protocol development.

IPv6 topics include performance (can it catch up to IPv4?), consolidation of common IPv4/IPv6 functionality, solving the IPv6 datacenter addressing problem, and providing network virtualization without encapsulation using logical IPv6 overlays.

Security topics include scalable networking security policies for containers, securing applications in multi-host data centers, encryption of overlays, and hardware support.

It appears that coordinated work in all three of these areas is required to make good progess. For more information, see the wiki page.

Extending the Early Bird Rate through June 5th 2015

We have decided to extend the Early Bird rate through June 5th 2015, to match LinuxCon North America’s dates and to allow more time for people to register, after authors notifications and schedule announcements. The regular rate will now start on June 6th.

Extending the Earlybird deadline to 29 May

Somewhere along the way, the deadline for notifications to Authors of the Shared LinuxCon/Plumbers track got pushed out by a week to 25 May.  In the light of that, we’re extending the deadline for Earlybird registration to Friday 29 May to allow anyone who doesn’t get a talk accepted but who still wishes to attend Plumbers to take advantage of the Earlybird registration rate.